"Layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale interlayer gaps as a stable host for lithium metal anodes"

Dingchang Lin: Yayuan Liu, Zheng Liang, Hyun-Wook Lee, Jie Sun, Haotian Wang, Kai Yan, Jin Xie & Yi Cui; Nature Nanotechnology, 03/21/16.

Additional Authors: Yayuan Liu, Zheng Liang, Hyun-Wook Lee, Jie Sun, Haotian Wang, Kai Yan, Jin Xie & Yi Cui

Abstract:

Metallic lithium is a promising anode candidate for future high-energy-density lithium batteries. It is a light-weight material, and has the highest theoretical capacity (3,860 mAh g–1) and the lowest electrochemical potential of all candidates. There are, however, at least three major hurdles before lithium metal anodes can become a viable technology: uneven and dendritic lithium deposition, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and almost infinite relative dimension change during cycling. Previous research has tackled the first two issues, but the last is still mostly unsolved. Here we report a composite lithium metal anode that exhibits low dimension variation (∼20%) during cycling and good mechanical flexibility. The anode is composed of 7 wt% ‘lithiophilic’ layered reduced graphene oxide with nanoscale gaps that can host metallic lithium. The anode retains up to ∼3,390 mAh g–1 of capacity, exhibits low overpotential (∼80 mV at 3 mA cm–2) and a flat voltage profile in a carbonate electrolyte. A full-cell battery with a LiCoO2 cathode shows good rate capability and flat voltage profiles.