"Universal Fractional Noncubic Power Law for Density of Metallic Glasses "

Qiaoshi Zeng,: Yoshio Kono, Yu Lin, Zhidan Zeng, Junyue Wang, Stanislav V. Sinogeikin, Changyong Park, Yue Meng, Wenge Yang, Ho-Kwang Mao, and Wendy L. Mao ; Physical Review Letters, 05/08/14.

Additional Authors: Yoshio Kono, Yu Lin, Zhidan Zeng, Junyue Wang, Stanislav V. Sinogeikin, Changyong Park, Yue Meng, Wenge Yang, Ho-Kwang Mao, and Wendy L. Mao

Abstract:

As a fundamental property of a material, density is controlled by the interatomic distances and the packing of microscopic constituents. The most prominent atomistic feature in a metallic glass (MG) that can be measured is its principal diffraction peak position (q1) observable by x-ray, electron, or neutron diffraction, which is closely associated with the average interatomic distance in the first shell. Density (and volume) would naturally be expected to vary under compression in proportion to the cube of the one-dimensional interatomic distance. However, by using high pressure as a clean tuning parameter and high-resolution in situ techniques developed specifically for probing the density of amorphous materials, we surprisingly found that the density of a MG varies with the 5/2 power of q1, instead of the expected cubic relationship. Further studies of MGs of different compositions repeatedly produced the same fractional power law of 5/2 in all three MGs we investigated, suggesting a universal feature in MG.