"Visualizing Energy Transfer at Buried Interfaces in Layered Materials Using Picosecond X-Rays"

Clare Nyby: Aditya Sood, Peter Zalden, Alexander J. Gabourie, Philipp Muscher, Daniel Rhodes, Ehren Mannebach, Jeff Corbett, Apurva Mehta, Eric Pop, Tony F.Heinz, Aaron M. Lindenberg; Advanced Functional Materials, 06/30/20.

Additional Authors: Aditya Sood, Peter Zalden, Alexander J. Gabourie, Philipp Muscher, Daniel Rhodes, Ehren Mannebach, Jeff Corbett, Apurva Mehta, Eric Pop, Tony F.Heinz, Aaron M. Lindenberg

Abstract:

Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale heat propagation is crucial for next-generation electronics. For instance, weak van der Waals bonds of layered materials are known to limit their thermal boundary conductance (TBC), presenting a heat dissipation bottleneck. Here, a new nondestructive method is presented to probe heat transport in nanoscale crystalline materials using time-resolved X-ray measurements of photoinduced thermal strain. This technique directly monitors time-dependent temperature changes in the crystal and the subsequent relaxation across buried interfaces by measuring changes in the c-axis lattice spacing after optical excitation. Films of five different layered transition metal dichalcogenides MoX2 [X = S, Se, and Te] and WX2 [X = S and Se] as well as graphite and a W-doped alloy of MoTe2 are investigated. TBC values in the range 10–30 MW m−2 K−1 are found, on c-plane sapphire substrates at room temperature. In conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations, it is shown that the high thermal resistances are a consequence of weak interfacial van der Waals bonding and low phonon irradiance. This work paves the way for an improved understanding of thermal bottlenecks in emerging 3D heterogeneously integrated technologies.