"Corrosion of lithium metal anodes during calendar ageing and its microscopic origins"

David T. Boyle: William Huang , Hansen Wang , Yuzhang Li, Hao Chen, Zhiao Yu, Wenbo Zhang, Zhenan Bao and Yi Cui; Nature Energy, 03/22/21.

Additional Authors: William Huang , Hansen Wang , Yuzhang Li, Hao Chen, Zhiao Yu, Wenbo Zhang, Zhenan Bao and Yi Cui

Abstract:

Rechargeable lithium (Li) metal batteries must have long cycle life and calendar life (retention of capacity during storage at open circuit). Particular emphasis has been placed on prolonging the cycle life of Li metal anodes, but calendar ageing is less understood. Here, we show that Li metal loses at least 2–3% of its capacity after only 24 hours of ageing, regardless of the electrolyte chemistry. These losses of capacity during calendar ageing also shorten the cycle life of Li metal batteries. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy shows that chemical corrosion of Li and the continuous growth of the solid electrolyte interphase—a passivation film on Li—cause the loss of capacity. Electrolytes with long cycle life do not necessarily form a solid electrolyte interphase with more resistance to chemical corrosion, so functional electrolytes must simultaneously minimize the rate of solid electrolyte interphase growth and the surface area of electrodeposited Li metal.