I am interested in materials where surprising behavior emerges from a dynamic, and sometimes subtle, interplay between many degrees of freedom.  A fundamental understanding of these emergent properties is key to designing new devices and tailoring materials with beneficial properties for energy production, harvesting, and storage.  The complexity of these systems means that large-scale, numerical simulations are crucial to an understanding of the root causes of material properties and their expression in different experimental probes.  I work closely with experimental groups who utilize leading light sources, such as SSRL and LCLS here at Stanford, to image electron dynamics through photon spectroscopies and use simulations to better interpret the results and guide future research.

Education

PhD, University of Oregon

MS, University of Oregon

Research Interests

My main research interests lie in the areas of theoretical condensed matter physics and computational physics.  My research effort focuses on using the tools of computational physics to understand quantum materials. Fortunately, we are poised in an excellent position as the speed and cost of computers have allowed us to tackle heretofore unaddressed problems involving interacting systems. The goal of my research is to understand electron dynamics via a combination of analytical theory and numerical simulations to provide insight into materials of relevance to energy science. My group carries out numerical simulations on SIMES’ high-performance supercomputer and US and Canadian computational facilities. The specific focus of my group is the development of numerical methods and theories of photon-based spectroscopies of strongly correlated materials.

Projects

  • Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARPES)
  • High-Temperature Superconductivity
  • Inelastic X-ray Scattering
  • Scanning Tunneling Microscopy
  • TIMES

Publications

See Publications for Thomas P. Devereaux, PhD